Memory Mondays: Aquatic Exercise for Seniors with Dementia

Engaging seniors with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia on various levels is a main objective for memory care communities, caregivers, family members, and loved ones. One such engaging activity is aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia.

For years, water therapy has been a means of strengthening the body with low impact and gentle movements. More recently, research shows aquatic therapy may have a significant impact on the brain, as well, helping those living with neurological conditions like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Exercise in general has long been linked to brain health. However, aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia promises unique benefits that improve quality of life, particularly in terms of:

– Joint function

– Motor coordination

– Balance

– Range of motion

– Blood flow to the brain

– Sleep quality

– Appetite

– Stress reduction

– Emotional well-being

Aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia may also be more effective than land-based exercises, according to some studies. It has been shown to boost independence in activities of daily living, as well.

At The Clare, aquatic exercise is a staple in the weekly activity calendar for our residents. This means they reap these benefits and more every time they participate in our aquatic exercise class offerings.

Types of Aquatic Exercise for Seniors with Dementia

There are many different kinds of aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia.

– Water aerobics, which usually entails water walking, dancing and other aerobic exercise similar to classes conducted on land

– Basic swimming, which offers a total body workout

– Water resistance, which includes arm curls, calf raises, leg swings, and more while in the pool

– Water relaxation, which may involve aqua yoga or Pilates

It’s important to check with your doctor before beginning a new exercise routine, especially when it comes to aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia. Above all, though, having fun should be a top priority with aquatic exercise for seniors with dementia.